Last edited by Mataxe
Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of Diffusion and the changing geographic distribution of primary care physicians. found in the catalog.

Diffusion and the changing geographic distribution of primary care physicians.

Diffusion and the changing geographic distribution of primary care physicians.

  • 198 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services, Public Health Service, Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, Office of Data Analysis and Management in [Washington, D.C.?] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States,
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Physicians -- Supply and demand -- United States -- Statistics.,
    • Osteopathic physicians -- Supply and demand -- United States -- Statistics.,
    • Medically underserved areas -- United States -- Statistics.,
    • Physicians -- Supply & distribution -- United States.,
    • Medically Underserved Area -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      ContributionsUnited States. Health Resources and Services Administration. Bureau of Health Professions. Office of Data Analysis and Management.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsRA410.7 .D44 1983
      The Physical Object
      Paginationviii, 52 p. ;
      Number of Pages52
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2999684M
      LC Control Number84602160

      A macro model of change in specialty and spatial distribution of physicians. Socieoeconomic Planning Sciences 26(2) •Henderson, Tim, Carrie Farmer, and Suzanne Szwarc. Practice location of physician graduates: Do states function as markets? National Conference of State Legislatures Institute for Primary Care and Workforce Analysis. PURPOSE: Little is known about whether different types of physician and nonphysician primary care clinicians vary in their propensity to care for underserved populations. The objective of this study was to compare the geographic distribution and patient populations of physician and nonphysician primary care clinicians. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional analysis of administrative.

        Rural Primary Care Physicians According to Unequal Distribution of the U.S. Primary Care Workforce, as of there were approximately 68 primary care physicians per , residents in rural areas, in contrast to urban areas, where the ratio is an average of 84 primary care physicians per , The primary care physician workforce is also aging, which is likely to lead . Direct Primary Care: The Changing Model of Family Medicine Direct primary care (DPC) has been gaining momentum over the past few years as an alternative physician practice model. This trend is becoming less of a fad and more of a viable solution for physicians who want to break away from traditional healthcare delivery systems.

      Newhouse and colleagues examined the changing geographic distribution of physicians between and and concluded that, as the supply of physicians has increased, competitive forces have encouraged the diffusion of physicians into rural areas (7). The implications of this diffusion of physicians for the future geographic distribution of. To achieve a better balance in the proportion of primary care physicians and specialists, continual efforts are needed to improve the specialty distribution of physician labor forces. Medical schools need to develop students' competencies in skills, values, and attitudes relevant to the practice of primary care.


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Diffusion and the changing geographic distribution of primary care physicians Download PDF EPUB FB2

Diffusion and the changing geographic distribution of primary care physicians. [Washington, D.C.?]: U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services, Public Health Service, Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, Office of Data Analysis and Management, [].

Get this from a library. Diffusion and the changing geographic distribution of primary care physicians. [United States. Health Resources and Services Administration. Bureau of Health Professions. Office of Data Analysis and Management.;]. Diffusion and the changing geographic distribution of primary care physicians.

By United States. Health Resources and Services Administration. Bureau of Health Professions. Office of Data Analysis and Management. Abstract. Item J-1 (microfiche)"HRP""HRS-P-OD"Distributed to depository libraries in es. Diffusion and the.

Changing' Geographic Distribution of Primary Care Physicians. Health Resources Administration (DHHS/PHS), Hyattsville, Md.

Bureau of Health Professions. HRP; HRS-P-OD Nov 83 62p.,; For related documents, zee HE and HE Some tables may not reproduce well. due to small print.

The federal government passed legislation in the 's and 70's to increase physician supplies and reduce spatial inequalities in access to physicians.

A major policy was to aggressively continue increasing the overall supply of physicians on the assumption that market forces would eventually divert physicians from areas of high physician density to those of low by: Title(s): Diffusion and the changing geographic distribution of primary care physicians.

Edition: Rev. Nov. Country of Publication: United States Publisher: [Washington, D.C.]: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, Office of Data. The Diffusion Of Physicians.

Despite considerable investment in increasing the number of primary care physicians in rural shortage areas, little is known about their movement rates and factors. Moreover, we wished to determine how the geographic distribution of physicians had changed since previous studies, in light of the large increase in physician numbers.

Design. Cross‐sectional data analyses of alternative measures of geographic access to physicians in 23 states with low physician–population ratios. Results. The Diffusion Of Physicians. Thomas C. Ricketts to address problems with the geographic distribution of primary care physicians.

the move was their initial change of. The debate over health care delivery in America has led to intense interest as to whether there is enough existing supply of primary care providers (PCPs) to meet the demand for services (Lowrey & Pear, ; Pipes, ).Some forecasts project national physician shortages upwards of 50, within the next decade (Dill & Salsberg, ; Petterson et al., ; Petterson, Liaw, Tran, &.

Introduction. Access to primary care in the US is uneven (Goodell et al., ) in part because the US, unlike most other countries, does not regulate the geographic distribution of its primary care professionals (Petterson, Phillips, Bazemore, & Koinis, ).The maldistribution of primary care (Mitka, ) is problematic especially for the enactment of the Patient Protection and.

Shortages are expected to occur in four categories of physicians: primary care (e.g. pediatrics and family medicine), medical specialties (e.g. internal medicine subspecialties), surgical specialties (e.g. ophthalmology and urology), and other various specialties (e.g.

emergency medicine, radiology, and anesthesiology). 3 According to the. Age Distribution of Primary Care Physicians Most primary care physicians arrive in the workforce in their late 20s, and typically remain in the workforce for 40 years.

The increased interest in primary care in the late s likely explains the age peak of physicians in their early 40s (Figure 2). Inmore than one-quarter of primary. 5 Most important, perhaps, is a federal study on the diffusion of primary care physicians.

Diffusion and the Changing Geographic Distribution of Primary Care Physicians. Toyokawa and Kobayashi found that the increasing supply of dentists in Japan supports the “spill-over” hypothesis, which predicts geographic diffusion of dentists toward less competitive area. In contrast, increasing the number of physicians had resulted in more concentrated geographic distribution of physicians in urban areas.

Moreover, we wished to determine how the geographic distribution of physicians had changed since previous studies, in light of the large increase in physician numbers.

Design Cross-sectional data analyses of alternative measures of geographic access to physicians in 23 states with low physician–population ratios.

Two main approaches have dominated economic theories of physician location; the traditional neoclassical view, in which it is assumed that the medical marketplace is truly competitive, and the prov. Maldistribution in the physician workforce has been a long-standing concern, 4 and several studies indicated that physicians locate not in regions with the greatest need 5 but rather where supply is already high.

6 In contrast, some studies suggested that there has been modest diffusion of primary care physicians from urban to rural counties 6. Nurse practitioners: A solution to America’s primary care crisis (September ) “Increasingly, researchers, workforce analysts and organizations that influence health policy support expanding the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) to fill the void left by the lack of primary care physicians and to improve the uneven geographic distribution of primary care.”.

To implement effective measures on geographical physician distribution, this study aimed to describe and compare the distribution of physicians by specialty inand in Japan, and. Objectives The objective of this study was to longitudinally examine the geographic distribution of physicians in Japan with adjustment for healthcare demand according to changes in population age structure.

Methods We examined trends in the number of physicians per population in Japan's secondary medical areas (SMAs) from to Healthcare demand was adjusted using health.Diffusion of Physicians and Access To Primary Care: The Role of Person, Program, and Place Thomas C.

Ricketts, PhD, MPH Research Brief, October I. Executive Summary/Key Findings. The local supply of physicians in any community, especially smaller and rural communities, depends on a flow of physicians into those communities.

The Geographic Distribution of Physicians Revisited The Geographic Distribution of Physicians Revisited Rosenthal, Meredith B.; Zaslavsky, Alan; Newhouse, Joseph P. Context. While there is debate over whether the U.S. is training too many physicians, many seem to agree that physicians are geographically maldistributed, with too few in rural areas.